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Otto

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101

Sonntag, 25. Februar 2018, 16:52

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial renamed Gateway Arch National Park

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Goodbye, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Hello, Gateway Arch National Park.
Most visitors to the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Mo., might not even realize that the site is also a national park originally named for Thomas Jefferson.
“The name ‘Jefferson National Expansion Memorial’ was established long before the Gateway Arch was envisioned, and has simply never been adopted by our millions of visitors,” says Mike Ward, Superintendent at the Gateway Arch National Park. “We hope this new name will best reflect the magnificent renovations and visitor experience we will unveil in a few months.”
The renaming bill was introduced in the U.S. Senate last year, and was signed into law by President Trump this past February. Other than the name, though, nothing else has changed.
“The mission of the park remains the same regardless of the park’s name,” says Ward. “The stories of Thomas Jefferson and his vision of westward expansion are woven throughout the new Museum at the Gateway Arch, which celebrates its grand opening on July 3, while Dred Scott and his freedom suit are showcased at the Old Courthouse.”

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102

Sonntag, 25. Februar 2018, 18:25

Glen Canyon day; is the dam a tombstone or a giver of new life?

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To some, it’s a tombstone. To others, it has been a giver of new life.

There are few events or issues in the annals of U.S. environmental history that have been as controversial as the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam, what the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation considers a crown jewel and a monument to its success at harnessing the waters of the mighty Colorado River.

To those who opposed the dam, Glen Canyon’s history reads like an obituary about the loss of an incomparable sandstone and water wonderland boasting a plethora of Native American ruins, emerald hanging gardens and a few spectacular natural bridges – a place to truly commune with nature and to find complete solitude since few made the effort to traverse the river along the canyon’s stretch.
Those on the other side of the issue feel the dam has improved Glen Canyon – now providing greater access to its breathtaking contrast of towering crimson sandstone walls and vast expanses of crystal blue water.
No matter what side one is on, the history of the grand red rock spectacle in Southern Utah and northern Arizona is a compelling one.

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103

Freitag, 2. März 2018, 17:23

America's most popular national parks are ...

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Nearly 331 million people visited the National Park Service's 417 sites around the United States in 2017, a slight dip from the 331 million record-breaking visits during its centennial anniversary year in 2016.
Park service officials expected the slight decline after the centennial celebrations during the previous year. In 2016, the park service recorded its third consecutive all-time attendance record, and 77 national park sites set new records for annual recreation visits. (Of the 417 sites in the National Park Service, 385 count visits.)
While attendance numbers remained relatively stable, people actually spent more time in the parks in 2017 -- more than 1.4 billion hours last year, an increase of 19 million hours over 2016.
"Our National Parks are being loved to death," said US Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke in a statement, whose agency oversees the National Park Service.
"As visitor rates continue at a high level, we must prioritize much-needed deferred maintenance including aging facilities, roads and other critical infrastructure. President Trump's proposal to establish a Public Lands Infrastructure Fund is a step in the right direction. This is not a Republican or Democrat issue, this is an American issue, and the President and I remain ready to work with anyone in Congress who is willing to get the job done."
Zinke is referring to the $11.6 billion in deferred maintenance at the nation's 417 National Park Service sites, which include the 59 headliner National Parks as well as national recreation areas, seashores, parkways, memorials, battlefields and more. Increased attendance at the destinations, only 118 of which charge admission, means that many locations can't keep up with repairs.
To make the point, the National Park Service released cost estimates for deferred maintenance at each of the top 10 most popular park sites and national parks.

Top three parks attract more than 40 million visits
The Blue Ridge Parkway (16 million visitors) took back the number one slot from 2016 winner Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which came in second place with nearly 15 million visitors last year.
Great Smoky Mountains National Park (11.3 million) came in third place, followed by Gateway National Recreation Area (9.2 million) and the Lincoln Memorial (nearly 8 million).
The top 10 park sites attracted more than 5 million recreation visits each, including Lake Mead National Recreation Area, George Washington Memorial Parkway, Natchez Trace Parkway, Grand Canyon National Park and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Trump's first year in the parks
President Donald Trump has not created any new national monuments during his first year in office, a power granted the president until the 1906 Antiquities Act. In contrast, President Barack Obama created 34 park sites during his eight years in office, including four in his final days in office. Some of those sites honored the country's civil rights struggle, African-American history, Japanese-American history and the fight for women's rights.
Trump signed two presidential proclamations on December 4, 2017 after declaring that he would reduce the size of two NPS monuments located in Utah.
In response, a group of Native American tribes filed a lawsuit against Trump and several administration officials claiming that his decision to significantly shrink Bears Ears National Monument is "in violation of the United States Constitution and the Antiquities Act of 1906."
Separately, US conservation organizations sued Trump and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke for dramatically shrinking Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Obama created Bears Ears and President Bill Clinton created Grand Staircase-Escalante.
Every fourth-grader around the country can still get a free one-year national parks pass for the student and his or her family under the "Every Kid in a Park" program, which has attracted more than 350,000 fourth graders in its first two years of operation.


Most popular National Park Service sites (417 total)
1. Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina/Virginia: Blue Ridge Parkway meanders for 469 miles through two states, revealing gorgeous views of the Appalachian Highlands that vary by season. Autumn's changing foliage is evident in a sunrise view of the mountains in Brevard, North Carolina mountains near Asheville.
Education Images/UIG/Getty Images
1. Blue Ridge Parkway (NC/VA): 16,093,765 visits ($186,619,608 deferred maintenance)
2. Golden Gate National Recreation Area (CA): 14,981,897 visits ($325,814,011 deferred maintenance)
3. Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NC/TN): 11,388,893 visits ($64,049,392 deferred maintenance)
4. Gateway National Recreation Area (NY/NJ): 9,190,610 visits ($788,419,471 deferred maintenance)
5. Lincoln Memorial (DC): 7,956,117 visits ($33,868,238 deferred maintenance)
6. Lake Mead National Recreation Area (AZ/NV): 7,882,339 visits ($205,540,564 deferred maintenance)
7. George Washington Memorial Parkway (DC/MD/VA): 7,562,793 visits ($233,441,316 deferred maintenance)
8. Natchez Trace Parkway (AL/MS/TN): 6,326,062 visits ($10,656,651 deferred maintenance)
9. Grand Canyon National Park (AZ): 6,254,238 visits ($329,437,056 deferred maintenance)
10. Vietnam Veterans Memorial (DC): 5,072,589 visits ($625,250 deferred maintenance)


Most popular National Parks (59 total)
1. Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NC/TN): 11,388,893 visits ($64,049,392 deferred maintenance)
2. Grand Canyon National Park (AZ): 6,254,238 visits ($329,437,056 deferred maintenance)
3. Zion National Park (UT): 4,504,812 visits ($65,291,893 deferred maintenance)
4. Rocky Mountain National Park (CO): 4,437,215 visits ($84,234,245 deferred maintenance)
5. Yosemite National Park (CA): 4,336,890 visits ($582,670,827 deferred maintenance)
6. Yellowstone National Park (ID/MT/WY): 4,116,524 visits ($515,808,008 deferred maintenance)
7. Acadia National Park (ME): 3,509,271 visits ($59,858,099 deferred maintenance)
8. Olympic National Park (WA): 3,401,996 visits ($120,719,515 deferred maintenance)
9. Grand Teton National Park (WY): 3,317,000 visits ($178,630,525 deferred maintenance)
10, Glacier National Park (MT): 3,305,512 visits ($153,838,276 deferred maintenance)

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Mittwoch, 7. März 2018, 18:12

Auf den Spuren Martin Luther Kings durch die US-Südstaaten

Als in den USA um gleiche Bürgerrechte für alle gerungen wurde, stand Martin Luther King im Zentrum des Geschehens. Vor 50 Jahren wurde der Baptistenprediger ermordet. An King und seine Zeit erinnern heute einige Museen. Eine Spurensuche in drei US-Südstaaten.

Zitat

Im Aschenbecher liegen zehn ausgedrückte Zigaretten, in der Tasse daneben ist Kaffee kalt geworden. Zimmer 306 des „Lorraine Motel“ in Memphis in Tennessee sieht so aus, wie es Martin Luther King am 4. April 1968 gegen 18.00 Uhr verlassen hat.
Kurz darauf traf ihn die tödliche Kugel eines Gewehrschützen. Besucher des National Civil Rights Museums, das seit 1991 in dem Hotelgebäude eingerichtet ist, können durch Fensterglas einen Blick hineinwerfen.
50 Jahre ist es her, dass Martin Luther King sein Leben verlor. Der charismatische Friedensnobelpreisträger von 1964 hat viel erreicht für die Bürger- und Wahlrechte der Afroamerikaner in den USA, er war kurz vor seinem Tod aber auch frustriert darüber, nicht mehr auch gegen die wirtschaftliche Ungleichheit im Lande bewirken zu können. Kings Zeitgenossen sind heute alt oder leben selbst nicht mehr. Die Aufgabe, die Erinnerung an ihn und sein Werk weiterzutragen, haben an Stationen seines Lebens mehrere Museen übernommen. Eine Tour mit vier Etappen: von Atlanta über Montgomery und Birmingham bis nach Memphis.

Station 1: ATLANTA, GEORGIA
Das Geburtshaus. Sein Grab auf einer Insel in einem künstlichen Pool vor dem King Center. Die alte Ebenezer Baptist Church, in der Martin Luther Kings Vater Pastor war. Alles liegt nahe beieinander im Stadtteil Auburn. Der US-Nationalparkservice ermöglicht freien Zugang. Nur für das gelb gestrichene Holzhaus, in dem MLK, wie er oft abgekürzt genannt wird, am 15. Januar 1929 zur Welt kam, wird der Zugang strikt reguliert: Sechs bis sieben Touren gibt es pro Tag, nur 15 Teilnehmer dürfen jeweils hinein ins Haus. Vor allem im Sommer ist der Andrang groß, sagt Lindsey Watts von Atlantas Tourismusbüro.
Der Weg zurück ins Stadtzentrum lässt sich gut mit einer Straßenbahn zurücklegen, man kann aber auch laufen - und begegnet dabei Menschen, die ganz anders wirken als die würdevollen Kirchenbesucher in der neuen Ebenezer Baptist Church, die 1999 gleich gegenüber der alten Kirche eröffnet wurde. Obdachlose stochern im Müll, Touristen werden angebettelt, Drogen zum Kauf angeboten. Auch wenn kein Gefühl von Unsicherheit aufkommt: Kings Traum von Lebensverhältnissen, die für alle in den USA zumindest ähnlich sind, ist hier nicht verwirklicht.
Wer mehr über die Bürgerrechtsbewegung der 1950er und 1960er Jahre erfahren will, findet im Center for Civil and Human Rights mitten in Atlanta eine gut gemachte Ausstellung. Das Museum zeigt unter anderem historische Filmaufnahmen, die vermitteln, mit welchen Argumenten die Befürworter der Segregation einst geglaubt haben, dieses Modell einer Gesellschaft mit einer Trennung nach Hautfarben behalten zu können.

Station 2: MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA (per Auto von Atlanta: zwei Stunden und 20 Minuten über den Interstate-Highway I-85, 260 Kilometer)
Rosa Parks hieß die Frau, die sich 1955 in der Hauptstadt Alabamas weigerte, im Bus ihren Platz für weiße Fahrgäste freizugeben und deshalb verhaftet wurde - der Auslöser für den Montgomery-Busboykott der Schwarzen, der 381 Tage dauerte und mit dem Ende der Segregation in den Bussen per Gerichtsbeschluss endete. Einer der Organisatoren dieses gewaltfreien Widerstand, war Martin Luther King, der 1954 in Montgomery seine erste Pastorenstelle angetreten hatte.
MLK's Kirche war die heutige Dexter King Memorial Church. Gerne zeigt Führerin Wanda Howard Battle Kings Schreibtisch aus den 1950er Jahren und das Pult, an dem er Predigten hielt. Später bittet sie die Besucher, sich die Hände zu reichen und mit ihr im Mittelgang der Kirche einen Kreis zu bilden. Für jeden Gast spricht Wanda ein Gebet. Anschließend singen alle gemeinsam „We shall overcome“, die Hymne der US-Bürgerrechtsbewegung. „So endet jede Tour hier“, erzählt Wanda.
Die Kirche gehört zum Anfang 2018 ins Leben gerufenen US Civil Rights Trail, einem Verbund von Schauplätzen der Bürgerrechtsbewegung. Unter dem Motto „Was hier geschah, hat die Welt verändert“ führt er zu gut 110 Orten in 14 US-Bundesstaaten und in Washington. Ziel sei es, Reisenden „zu zeigen, was sich an einzelnen Orten ereignet hat und sie herausfinden zu lassen, wie diese Erfolge den Menschen anderswo Mut gemacht haben“, erläutert Alabamas Tourismusdirektor Lee Sentell.
Kein US-Staat ist beim US Civil Rights Trail so stark vertreten wie Alabama, allein in Montgomery sind es zehn Erinnerungsstätten. Für Rosa Parks gibt es ein eigenes Museum, und im „Civil Rights Memorial Center“ wird der mindestens 41 Menschen gedacht, die im Kampf für die Bürgerrechte starben - einer von ihnen war Martin Luther King.

Station 3: BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA (per Auto von Montgomery: eine Stunde und 30 Minuten über den Interstate-Highway I-65, 150 Kilometer)
Alabamas größtes Ballungszentrum kannte lange Zeit besonders harte Segregationsgesetze: „Die Stadtregierung hatte jede kleine Einzelheit des Alltags detailliert geregelt“, erzählt Barry McNealy, der Gäste durch das Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (CRI) führt. Es ist ein weiteres beeindruckendes Museum zur Geschichte der Bürgerrechtsbewegung. Noch 1950 wurde zum Beispiel das gemeinsame Baseball-, Basketball- und Footballspielen von Schwarzen und Weißen in der Stadt verboten.
Obwohl sie fast 40 Prozent der Bevölkerung stellten, durften Dunkelhäutige im Jahr 1940 nur auf 11 Prozent der Stadtfläche leben, dicht an dicht und mit schlechterer Infrastruktur. 50 rassistisch motivierte Bombenanschläge auf schwarze Einrichtungen von 1945 bis 1962 brachten der Stadt zeitweise den Spitznamen „Bombingham“ ein.
Am 12. April 1963 wurde Martin Luther King während eines Protestmarsches durch Birmingham festgenommen. Wenige Wochen später demonstrierten dann Tausende Schüler auf Straßen und Plätzen gegen die Segregation. Die lokale Polizei unter Kommando von Commissioner Eugene „Bull“ Connor reagierte brutal. Sie setzte unter Hochdruck stehende Feuerwehrschläuche und scharfe Schäferhunde gegen Teenager ein. Filmaufnahmen davon sorgten weltweit erst für Entsetzen und dann für größere politische Unterstützung für die Bürgerrechtsbewegung.
Mehrere Denkmäler im Kelly Ingram Park erinnern heute an diese Zeit, auch für MLK steht dort eine Statue. Sie blickt quer über die Straße zur 16th Street Baptist Church, wo am 15. September 1963 an der Außenwand eine Bombe explodierte und im Keller vier junge Mädchen tötete. Die Uhr, die durch die Detonation um 10.22 Uhr stehenblieb, ist heute in einer Ausstellung in dem Backsteingebäude zu sehen.

Station 4: MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE (per Auto von Birmingham: drei Stunden und 40 Minuten über den Interstate-Highway I-22, 390 Kilometer)
Der letzte Stopp auf der Reise. Martin Luther King kam 1968 in der Stadt am Mississippi, um einen Müllmännerstreik zu unterstützen. „I am a Man“, stand bei den Märschen auf den Plakaten der Arbeiter. Das sollte zugleich heißen: „I'm not a boy“, denn als Boys - also als Jungs oder Laufburschen - wurden dunkelhäutige Männer damals oft abwertend bezeichnet. Das Streikhauptquartier, die Methodistenkirche Clayborn Temple, wird nach rund 20 Jahren Leerstand gerade aufwendig renoviert.
Was die Müllarbeiter antrieb, zeigt das National Civil Rights Museum. Dessen Ausstellung reicht aber auch weiter zurück bis in die Zeit der Sklaverei, die in den USA fast 250 Jahre dauerte. Wer mag, kann die Geschichte der Segregation und der Bürgerrechtsbewegung hier nochmal nachvollziehen, Rosa Parks wieder begegnen und Martin Luther King bei seiner berühmten Rede „I have a dream“ 1963 in Washington zuhören.
Auch das Haus auf der anderen Straßenseite, aus dem ein Mann namens James Earl Ray um 18.01 Uhr den tödlichen Schuss auf King abgegeben haben soll, gehört zum Museum. Die Ausstellung dort widmet sich auch der Frage, ob Ray wirklich alleiniger Täter war. Eine Antwort gibt das Museum nicht. Und so steht man später etwas rätselnd auf dem Museumsvorplatz und schaut auf den Kranz, der an der Balkonbrüstung genau vor der Tür zu Zimmer 306 hängt - dMovement für immer verstummte.

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105

Freitag, 9. März 2018, 17:13

16 Must-see U.S. Landmarks That Celebrate Women’s History

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In 1987, the month of March was officially designated by Congress for the celebration and acknowledgement of women’s history.
Even before the suffragists began marching in the streets in the mid-19th century, women have made their mark on history. The homes they left behind as well as the historic buildings that served as meeting places and convention halls are reminders of their presence and the roles they played in moving toward gender equality.
With International Women’s Day on March 8, not only are places like the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, and the Smithsonian Institution joining in to celebrate women’s contribution to American history, there are several smaller sites around the U.S. that pay particular tribute to these historic women all year — and especially this time of year.

The monuments and museums dedicated solely to women’s history, though there are not many currently, serve to remind future generations of the power of women, how far we’ve come and how far we still have to go for equality. At these landmarks, anyone can join in to celebrate women whenever they wish, at any time of the year.

Women’s Rights National Historical Park, Seneca Falls, New York
This dedicated national park was established in 1980. The park connects to the Votes For Women History Trail, a route that connects important women’s historical sites in upstate New York. Many homes of several early suffragists, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Jane Hunt, are part of its grounds as well.

National Women’s Hall of Fame, Seneca Falls, New York
Created in 1969 at the very same city as the original 1848 Women’s Rights Convention, this museum honors more than 200 pioneering women in history. The Hall is currently housed in the Helen Mosher Barben Building, in the heart of the downtown Historic District.

Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument, Washington, D.C.
Named after Alva Belmont and Alice Paul, this former headquarters of the National Woman's Party was finally made a national monument by former President Barack Obama in 2016. It’s also one of the oldest historic mansions in the capital.

Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park, Richmond, California
This museum honors the female factory worker of the World War II era, most famously depicted as “Rosie The Riveter.” Visitors can explore the museum and park while learning about how helping the war effort was also a small boost toward gender equality.

Lowell National Historical Park, Lowell, Massachusetts
Commemorating the women who worked in textile mills during a time when very few women worked outside the home, these factories (now making up Lowell National Historical Park) in New England were an important step in helping women lead independent lives.

Susan B. Anthony House & Museum, Rochester, New York
This was the home of the legendary civil rights leader for 40 years, and the site of her famous arrest for voting in 1872. It was also headquarters of the National American Woman Suffrage Association while she was president. The museum also features an Anthony re-enactor.

Harriet Tubman Home, Auburn, New York
The home of the famous civil rights activist and suffragist originally belonged to New York Senator William Seaward, who sold the property to Tubman in 1858. Tubman had known Seaward because the home had been a station in the Underground Railroad. After buying the home, Tubman settled in Auburn to continue her life’s work.

The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, Cambridge, Maryland
Tubman played a vital role in American slave liberation by leading slaves to the free states in the North. After the Civil War, Tubman also became one of the first suffragists. This trail is a particularly important remembrance for civil rights history.

Kate Mullany House, Troy, New York
Mullany’s brick home in Troy looks like a simple residential building, but it holds so much history. Mullany was an Irish immigrant who founded the Collar Laundry Union, which was the first all-female union, in 1864. She also became vice-president of the National Labor Union later on.

Matilda Joslyn Gage Home, Fayettevillve, New York
Gage is all but unknown today but during her lifetime she was a key member of the women’s suffragist movement. She was a believer in egalitarianism and a women’s right to her own body, and Native sovereignty, as well as being an abolitionist. Her stately home was also a station on the Underground Railroad.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett House, Chicago, Illinois
This gorgeous gray stone house was once the home of this African-American activist and a co-founder of the NAACP. She was also one of the earliest female investigative journalists, and wrote important pieces on lynchings in the South.

Pauli Murray House, Durham, North Carolina
Pauli Murray, an early, prolific civil rights activist, co-founded the National Organization for Women as well as authored books on discrimination laws. Her childhood home, which is being petitioned to become a historic landmark by the Pauli Murray Project and National Trust for Historic Preservation, is currently being restored to its original state.

Clara Barton National Historic Site, Glen Echo, Maryland
Founder of the Red Cross, Clara Barton’s large, wooden home became a historic landmark in 1975. The house is also surrounded by a park where people can explore and attend events and learn about her life.

Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, Richmond, Virginia
Maggie L. Walker, an African-American entrepreneur who managed to stay prosperous during the Great Depression. She ran a store, started a newspaper and started her own bank. Her home is still a beautiful, well-kept mansion and park that is open to visitors.

Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, Washington, D.C.
This townhouse is also the birthplace of the National Council of Negro Women and the home of its founder, an advisor to Franklin Delano Roosevelt as part of his “Black Cabinet,” and also known as “The First Lady of the Struggle.”

Rankin Ranch, Avalanche Gulch, Montana
Visit the home of the first female member of Congress, Jeanette Rankin, who was elected in 1916, before the 19th Amendment was even ratified. Rankin played an essential role in passing it.

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106

Mittwoch, 14. März 2018, 18:48

Washington Monument, DC

Durch das Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC (Link hier) bin ich darauf gestossen, dass das Washington Monument voraussichtlich bis zum Frühjahr 2019 gesclossen ist. Da ich hier dazu nichts gefunden habe, hier die Info:

Zitat

Businessman and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein has pledged the funding needed for the National Park Service to modernize the Washington Monument elevator. The $2-3 million project will correct the elevator’s ongoing mechanical, electrical and computer issues, which have shuttered the monument since August 17.

Mr. Rubenstein said, “The monument has become a symbol of our country, and reminds everyone of the towering strengths of our first president. I am honored to help make this symbol safely accessible again to all Americans as soon as practicable.”

Rubenstein’s gift to the National Park Foundation’s Centennial Campaign for America’s National Parks will allow the National Park Service to replace the computer system that controls the elevator and to add a remote diagnostic system, which will permit technicians to more quickly determine the cause of problems when they occur. It will also provide funds to refurbish the existing elevator machine and gear; replace existing hardware, including door operators, hoist-way ropes, compensation cables, rollers, electrical conductors, breakers and power supplies, and the elevator cab ventilation system; install audio/visual screens in the elevator cab; and install code compliant landings every 30 feet in the elevator shaft.

“The Washington Monument is one of our Nation’s most iconic structures. It is one of many monuments in Washington, D.C. that is important in telling the story of America’s rich and diverse history,” said Jonathan B. Jarvis, Director of the National Park Service. “Mr. Rubenstein’s continued support for the Washington Monument will ensure generations of visitors can safely enjoy this historically significant monument for years to come.”

Rubenstein’s “patriotic philanthropy” benefitting the National Park Service makes him a leader in the incredible legacy of private support for national parks:
January 2012 - $7.5 million to restore the Washington Monument after the earthquake
July 2014 - $12.35 million to restore Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial
September 2014 - $5 million endowment for the White House Visitor Center
April 2015 - $5.37 million to improve the U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial
February 2016 - $18.5 million to restore the Lincoln Memorial
April 2016 - $1 million to fund critical repairs to Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument

"Mr. Rubenstein's continued support carries on the legacy of private citizens who came together to establish and support our national parks," said Will Shafroth, president of the National Park Foundation. "His ongoing commitment to protect and enhance these treasured places ensures they will be accessible and preserved for all to enjoy."

The National Park Service has also requested funding in its FY 2017 President’s Budget Request to construct a permanent screening facility for the Washington Monument. The Washington Monument is expected to re-open to visitors in 2019.

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107

Freitag, 16. März 2018, 17:48

Seven natural wonders in Wisconsin

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Wisconsin doesn't have the 3-mile-high peaks of the Himalayas or the unexplored underwater caves of Mexico, but this great state does have its share of natural wonders. Here are seven of them.

Apostle Islands sea caves
The 21 islands that make up the Apostles archipelago in Lake Superior are beautiful, but what really makes them special are the red-brown sandstone sea caves that line their shores. Sculpted by the tempestuous waters of the biggest of the Great Lakes, the caves feature winding passageways, arches and other formations.
In the summer, the islands and caves are a favorite for sea kayakers and other boaters. Come winter, if Lake Superior freezes enough, hikers trek to see the mainland caves draped in massive icicles.
The sea caves can be found on the mainland, on the west side of the Bayfield peninsula, and Sand and Devils islands.

Cave of the Mounds
Caves are one of the last frontiers for exploration in the world. Near Blue Mounds, this National Natural Landmark remained hidden until 1939, when quarry workers accidentally blew into it.
If you grew up anywhere close to the cave, you probably visited it on a school trip — those groups make up one-third of the 100,000 visitors every year. But the cave is dazzling and well worth a visit as an adult.
Forty to 70 feet below ground, stalactites and stalagmites meet to form columns, delicate soda straws dangle from the ceiling and flowstones cover the walls. Lighted walkways provide easy access while informed tour guides explain how the magical cave and its formations came to be.

Niagara Escarpment
This 1,000-mile rock ledge that stretches from New York through Wisconsin is responsible for one of the country's most impressive natural wonders: Niagara Falls.
In Wisconsin it presents itself in the form of blocky, white towering cliffs in a handful of parks. Door County is one of the best spots to see it. At Cave Point County Park on the east side of the peninsula, the white cliffs spill into Lake Michigan, giving it a tropical blue-green hue. On the west side, the cliffs rise 150 feet above Green Bay at Peninsula State Park. Farther south, you can hike above and below the cliffs at High Cliff State Park.

Baraboo bluffs
There's a reason Devil's Lake State Park is Wisconsin's most popular state park. Purple-brown quartzite cliffs rise 600 feet above the lake, with interesting formations including the Devil's Doorway, a stone arch, and Balanced Rock, an inverted top-shaped rock, scattered on trails along the bluffs.
It's one of the few spots in Wisconsin for serious rock climbing, with the slick quartzite challenging climbers on more than 1,600 routes. Hikers take to the bluffs, too, stair-climbing the trails to the top for views of the lake and surrounding Baraboo Hills.

Two Great Lakes
When someone in Florida once described a retention-pond view to me as "lakeview," I laughed. Where I come from, lakes are the size of seas.
The Great Lakes hold one-fifth of the world's fresh water. Bordering Wisconsin to the north, Lake Superior is the world's largest freshwater lake by surface area. To the east, Lake Michigan is the second largest Great Lake and the only one completely within the United States' borders.
Being bordered by two Great Lakes has its advantages: sandy beaches, ocean-like views (including sunsets and sunrises), deep "sea" fishing for salmon and trout, sailing, kayaking, and even surfing and scuba diving. Our Great Lakes also gift us with that famous (infamous?) lake effect snow — regular white stuff in northern Wisconsin for skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling and more snowy activities.

Horicon Marsh
Every spring and fall, hundreds of thousands of Canada geese use Horicon Marsh as a pit stop on their migrations. At peak, it's possible to see tens of thousands at one time.
Canada geese aren't the only draw. More than 300 bird species have been spotted at the 33,000-acre marsh, the largest freshwater cattail marsh in the country. The annual Horicon Marsh Bird Festival, held over Mother's Day weekend, is one of the best times to see many of those species, with experts on hand to help identify them.

Big Manitou Falls
At 165 feet, Big Manitou Falls is Wisconsin's tallest waterfall, the fourth highest cascade east of the Rockies and just 2 feet shorter than Niagara Falls.
The massive cascade tumbles over black-brown basalt rock, an igneous rock born of billion-year-old lava flows. Pines and mixed hardwoods frame the torrent of water.
The waterfall is protected as part of Pattison State Park, and a couple overlooks provide views of it from above. The park is also home to Little Manitou Falls, a 30-foot twin cascade visitors can get closer to than its big sister.

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108

Freitag, 23. März 2018, 17:26

The most underrated US attractions: readers’ travel tips

Our tipsters sidestep big cities and theme parks to explore a bridge leading nowhere, great galleries, steaming volcanoes and outposts of US history

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Winning tip:
Kinzua Bridge Sky Walk, Pennsylvania
The jewel of Kinzua Bridge state park is the Kinzua Viaduct (once the US’s highest railway bridge). In 2003 it was hit by a tornado, which ripped away a large section. The Pennsylvania government decided that what remained of the bridge should be left as an example of the forces of nature. So it built an amazing visitor centre and sky walk where you can walk to a glass-floored observation deck at the edge of the viaduct’s remains for amazing aerial views of the state park, the valley and the creek. A hundred metres below your feet you’ll see the mangled remnants of the structure currently holding you up.


EAST
Shelburne Museum, Vermont
Visitors to the enchanting Shelburne Museum’s 45 acres of grounds (just south of Burlington) are free to roam around its eclectic assortment of historic structures relocated from across New England, including a lighthouse, a covered bridge and steamboat. The Park Avenue apartment of its wealthy antique-collecting founder, Electra Havemeyer Webb, has been recreated and refurnished with her paintings by Monet and the feminist impressionist Mary Cassatt, but the real charm of the Shelburne is its huge collection of Americana – bird decoys, textiles, toys and horse-drawn vehicles. We found our visit an excellent way to walk off all the local cheddar cheese, apple cider doughnuts and maple syrup consumed on our road trip through Vermont.

Lost River Caverns, Philadelphia
Cave tours are something of an American road-trip tradition, and few caves tap into that bygone era as well as Lost River Caverns. From the indoor garden (complete with model dinosaurs and the region’s only fruit-bearing banana tree) to the rotating display cases in the gift shop, a visit here is like stepping into a pocket of suspended time. The cave tour itself takes about 45 minutes and uses 400 metres of well-lit paved walkways through amazing limestone formations. It’s an often-overlooked gem between Philadelphia and New York but well worth a visit.

Roosevelt Island, New York City
Ride the F-Line from the buzz of Manhattan to the tranquillity of Roosevelt Island in the middle of the East river. With great views of Brooklyn and Manhattan from a different perspective, this is a side of NYC that is ignored by most the visitors to the city. Spend an hour or more walking through the gardens and parks of the derelict 1850s-built smallpox isolation hospital (designed by one of the greatest US architects, James Renwick Jr), then have drinks or lunch at one of the cafe bars before you head back to the whirl of Manhattan via the cable car. The return on the cable car is a real highlight, with great views of the city. An hour or two spent here will set you up for the rest of your visit to the city.


SOUTH
Whitney Plantation, Louisiana
Just outside New Orleans, Whitney is a museum and plantation that highlights the lives of the slaves in the South with brutal honesty. The staff are knowledgeable, passionate and dedicated to the retelling of a history that many plantations seem to shy away from, some choosing instead to focus on the “big house”. Throughout the site there are statues of children who were once recorded to have lived on the plantation. There are monuments filled with quotes from slaves: one shows the grisly result of a slave rebellion – 60 heads on sticks, a startling reconstruction of what happened to those who tried to escape or fight against their oppression. With a gift shop filled with further reading, fair trade products, and historical murals, the opportunity for further learning does not stop at the guided tour of the plantation itself.

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Arkansas
This museum is in a beautiful Ozarks location, in Bentonville (home of the family behind Walmart – Alice Walton funded and created it) spanning a lake. The grounds – through which there are miles of trails – are peaceful, wooded and full of sculptures but the inside is a revelation. The collection goes from early US history to the latest in modern art. There were few visitors as I wandered through the halls, and I found myself often standing alone during my 90-minute visit. Sometimes, the wealthy put something back into the community and this museum of art, hidden in the middle of Arkansas, is a stunning example of American philanthropy.


MID-WEST
Winterset, Iowa
Winterset, Iowa, is where Clint Eastwood filmed much of the Bridges of Madison County and not much about it has changed, including the diner in the old-fashioned town square where he shot some scenes. John Wayne was from this town and you can visit the house where he was born along with the John Wayne Museum. Madison County is the covered bridge capital of Iowa, so make the short drive down the lush country lanes and marvel at these gems. If you’re there on 13/14 October you’ll catch the Madison County Covered Bridge Festival (entry $2).

Crazy Horse Memorial, South Dakota
Often overlooked in favour of nearby Mount Rushmore, Crazy Horse Memorial is the world’s largest mountain carving, and when completed, it will depict Oglala Lakota warrior Crazy Horse mounted and pointing into the distance. Sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski was originally commissioned to create the memorial to all Native Americans. Work commenced in 1948 and is continued to this day by his family, who are committed to complete his life’s work. The family have refused any state or federal funding for the project and all monies for the project are collected at the visitor centre and through private donation.

Mammoth graveyard, South Dakota
At the Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, 61 mammoth skeletons have so far been found, piled one on top of each other. A combined museum and active dig centres on a prehistoric sinkhole that once drew in and trapped mammoths eager to enjoy its hot water. It’s a paleontological wonder that can easily be combined in one day with nearby Custer state park, with its herds of living giants – the mighty buffalo.


NORTH-WEST
American Computer and Robotics Museum, Montana
This little, unassuming museum in Bozeman is as amazing on the inside as it is boring on the outside – and, best of all, it’s free. It’s packed with exhibits from the first forays into binary to our modern semiconductor-powered world, plus items such as Tesla and Bell artefacts and original American civil war telegrams. The museum has had significant funding from Steve Wozniak (co-founder of Apple) and his money, as well as his donated exhibits, have provided unique displays. A highly recommended visit off the beaten track.


WEST
Lassen Volcanic national park, California
This is so much better – and far less crowded – than Yellowstone national park. It has crazy geologic features such as thermal vents, hot springs and mud pots, as well as beautiful mountain views (it contains all four main types of volcano). It’s about a three-hour drive from San Francisco.

Salvation Mountain, California
Visiting Salvation Mountain was like a surreal dream: it sits in the grey desert in southern California, among towns that feel like they have been forgotten by the rest of America. It’s about an hour’s drive south of Joshua Tree national park, and is close to the Salton Sea. It’s the creation of one Leonard Knight, who built it from adobe and straw, after researching local Navajo methods. He covered it in colourful paint and sayings from the Bible. Knight has now passed away but Salvation Mountain lives on. The 2007 Sean Penn film Into the Wild includes segments shot here, with Knight making an appearance, and Jarvis Cocker visited in the late 1990s to interview him for a C4 series on outsider art.

Nit Wit Ridge, California
Just a few miles down the coast from ostentatious Hearst Castle is the more interesting and eclectic domain that is Nit Wit Ridge. On the edge of the seaside town of Cambria, this bizarre home was built by Art Beal, a refuse collector. The place was built out of discarded building materials and other people’s junk, including wheel rims, abalone shells, old sinks and ringpulls. It is perched on a hillside and current owners Michael and Sheila O’Malley have tidied up and repaired it but left the place much as it was when Beal was living there. It’s as eccentric as the castle up the road but much more fun and a bit weird. Forget Randolph Hearst’s herd of zebras too, and drive 11 miles up the coast to Piedras Blancas beach to see the elephant seals, wonderful and vocal indigenous inhabitants. The beach bar serves amazing chowder and is a good place to watch the sun go down over Moonstone beach.

Indian Grinding Rock state historic park, California
Grinding Rock park, not far from Jackson, California, is one of the most comprehensive Native American sites in the US, dedicated to an understanding of the Miwok people who once lived there. Tools, basketry, replica ceremonial dwellings and a superb collection of rock carvings were all interesting but the highlight was undoubtedly the 1,000-plus, lunar-like “mortar holes” in the limestone rocks. Made by generations of Miwok as they ground acorns to make meal, they provide a rare and indestructible imprint of an ancient way of life. Fascinating – and we had the site almost to ourselves. There are also mile-long trails and plenty of wildlife in the surrounding oak and pine woods.

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109

Freitag, 23. März 2018, 17:35

Interessante Orte dabei Dankeschön.

Crazy Horse Memorial sind wir mit Absicht nicht hin, weil nach meinem Verständnis nicht offiziell im Namen der Indianer. Grinding Rock ist cool.

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110

Mittwoch, 28. März 2018, 17:05

Carlsbad Caverns National Park

No Elevator Service After Successful Rescue from Stranded Elevator

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On March 26, one of the secondary elevators at Carlsbad Caverns National Park became stranded at 740 feet below the surface with three visitors inside due to a mechanical issue.

National Park Service rangers communicated with the visitors via the elevator phone system to ensure their well being and to keep them updated. The park activated the inter-agency search and rescue team consisting of the Carlsbad Fire Department and National Park Service (NPS) rangers. The rescue team set up rigging in the hoist way and with three EMT/paramedics inside the operational elevator and an NPS ranger up on top, lowered themselves to the stranded car. After reaching the visitors, the team harnessed up each visitor with a lifeline and transferred them through the roof escape hatches to the operational elevator. After 3.5 hours, the visitors were safely back at the park's visitor center in good spirits.

"This is the first time we've had to conduct an elevator rescue operation and it went smoothly because the inter-agency search and rescue team had just recently trained for this exact scenario," said NPS Incident Commander Tim Havens.

An inspection indicated that the elevator became stranded due to a worn travel cable. The travel cable sends the correct signal to the controls that allow the elevator car to operate. Plans to repair the cable and reinstate elevator service are currently being developed.

Until the cable is repaired, there is no elevator service into and out of the cavern. Visitors will still be able to enjoy the cavern by hiking the Natural Entrance Trail. This 1.25 mile trail involves a steep 75-story hike into and out of the cavern. For safety, the trail isn't accessible to wheelchairs, strollers, or walkers.

The secondary elevators that are currently not operational are part of two separate elevator systems (in two separate elevator shafts) at Carlsbad Caverns National Park. The primary elevator system was originally installed in 1955 and went out of service in November 2015 when a six-inch motor shaft unexpectedly sheared off. Work to repair and modernize the primary elevators began in December 2017, and is on schedule to be completed by the end of May 2018. The secondary elevators have been providing all park elevator service while the primary elevators are being rebuilt.

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111

Mittwoch, 28. März 2018, 18:51

Alaska is home to least visited national parks

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National parks get tens of millions of visits every year, but five of the 10 least visited are in Alaska.
In total, Gates of the Arctic, Kobuk Valley, Lake Clark, Katmai, and Wrangell-St. Elias National Parks drew just over 155,000 visits last year.


Some more facts about these five Alaska parks:

Gates of the Arctic (11,177 annual visits)
The Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve is the northernmost National Park in the U.S. and the second largest in terms of size, at 8,472,506 acres.

Kobuk Valley, Alaska (15,500 annual visits)
Due to the fact that no roads lead to Kobuk Valley, air taxis are required to access it. These flights are available all year-round, but are dependant on the state of the weather.

Lake Clark, Alaska (22,755 annual visits)
The Lake was proclaimed as a National Monument by President Carter on December 1, 1978, and its remote nature (only accessible by plane or boat) has contributed to it being one of the least visited parks in the U.S.

Katmai, Alaska (37,818 annual visits)
It's named after Mount Katmai, the stratovolcano in the center of the park, which reaches 6,716 feet at its highest point. There is now a crater-lake that has a depth of 800 feet, which was formed after an eruption in 1912.

Wrangell-St. Elias (68,292 annual visits)
Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Reserve is the largest area managed by the National Park Service. It's 13,175,799 acres are so large that it could encapsulate a total of six Yellowstone National Parks within its boundaries.

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Mittwoch, 28. März 2018, 19:57

Joshua Tree National Park

Arson suspected in fire damaging historic landmark at Joshua Tree National Park

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Officials are opening an arson investigation into a fire at Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California.
The fire, which began Monday night, is under investigation by the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management and the San Bernardino County Fire Department, the park service said.
The 2.5-acre blaze largely affected the Oasis of Mara, which the park service calls the "cornerstone" of the park's story.

Legend has it that the Native American Serrano tribe, believed to have first settled the area, did so on the instructions of a medicine man, who told the tribe members to plant a palm tree each time a boy was born; they purportedly planted 29 their first year there.
Dramatic photos taken by Steve Raines show a number of palm trees and other vegetation ablaze in the area.
Park service staff are evaluating the extent of the damage to the site after the fire was contained. A preliminary assessment found that while no structures were damaged, there was damage to "multiple natural resources, including palms and other vegetation, and wildlife, as well as potential impact to archaeological resources."

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113

Sonntag, 1. April 2018, 17:00

Florida photographer captures the stunning beauty of the Everglades

Years of practice have made Paul Marcellini one of the state's best landscape photographers.
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Donnerstag, 5. April 2018, 17:08

Olympic National Park

Road Project Set to Begin on Hurricane Ridge Road

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oad work is set to begin Monday, April 9 on a five-month project to rehabilitate the first five miles of Hurricane Ridge Road from the intersection with Mt. Angeles Road to the Heart O’ the Hills entrance station.

The road work will include utility work, pavement rehabilitation, culvert installation, guardrail installation, and paving. Drivers should expect delays of up to 20 minutes in both directions during weekday work hours. Flaggers and pilot cars will guide drivers through the active construction areas and temporary traffic signs and devices will be installed for weekend and evening travel as needed.

“While we recognize the inconvenience of this road construction for park visitors and local residents in the Lake Dawn community, we are looking forward to improved conditions and an extended lifespan for this busy road,” said park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum. “We ask the public for their patience and understanding as we complete this project.”

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Montag, 9. April 2018, 18:23

Fun Facts About All 59 U.S. National Parks

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Uncover lesser-known secrets about these iconic landscapes.

Over the last year alone, its 84 million acres were visited over 331 million times. But this vast network still has plenty of secrets left to explore. Here are some surprising facts about each of the 59 parks.

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Mittwoch, 11. April 2018, 17:30

Glacier National Park

Dieser Bär hat keine Lust, endgültig aus seiner Winterruhe zu erwachen

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Der Frühling ist da! Die Vögel zwitschern, die ersten Blumen blühen, und die Tiere erwachen aus ihrem Winterschlaf. Nur nicht dieser Bär in den USA. Er ist einfach noch viel zu müde und wird dank seiner Trägheit zum viralen Hit.

Gäbe es eine Snooze-Taste für Schwarzbären, dieser aus dem Glacier Nationalpark im US-Bundesstaat Montana würde sie pausenlos drücken. Die Schlafmütze kommt nach seiner Winterruhe einfach nicht in die Gänge.
Der Bär hat sein Lager in einer Pappel aufgeschlagen. Mitarbeiter des Nationalparks bemerkten ihn dort erstmals am 23. März und installierten gegenüber seiner Baumhöhle eine Webcam.

Bärenstark sieht irgendwie anders aus. Teilweise kann das Tier kaum die Augen offen halten. Verträumt hängt er in seiner kuscheligen Höhle. Ab und an reckt und streckt er sich. Bisher hat der Bär es gerade mal in das nahegelegene Geäst geschafft. Verlassen hat er den Baum noch nicht.

Amerikanische Schwarzbären gehen in freier Wildbahn je nach Lebensraum und Witterung zwischen September und Dezember in Winterruhe. Einen tiefen Schlaf halten sie nicht. Die Bären senken ihre Körpertemperatur um ein paar Grad ab, Atemfrequenz und Herzschlag werden verlangsamt. Um sich bei einem möglichen Angriff verteidigen zu können, wachen sie leicht auf.
Je nach Außentemperatur, meist also ab März, wacht Meister Petz langsam wieder aus seiner Winterruhe auf. Das kann aber schon mal ein paar Wochen dauern - wie bei dem Schwarzbär aus Montana eben.

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Mittwoch, 11. April 2018, 18:48

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Rainbow Falls Trail Project Continues

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Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials announced that the second phase of a 2-year trail rehabilitation project will begin Monday, April 16 on the popular Rainbow Falls Trail.
The trail will be closed April 16 through Nov. 15 on Monday mornings at 7 a.m. through Thursday evenings at 5:30 p.m. weekly. Due to the construction process on the narrow trail, a full closure is necessary for the safety of both the crew and visitors. The trail will be fully open each week on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday and on federal holidays.
"I encourage everyone to hike the trail this season on the open days to see the transformation taking place first hand,” said Park Superintendent Cassius Cash. “It is truly inspiring to see the craftsmanship our Trails Forever crew brings into the design of trail improvements. The rehabilitated sections are not only more sustainable and safer for hikers, but they also blend naturally into the landscape.”

The Trails Forever crew will continue to focus rehabilitation efforts on several targeted locations along the 6-mile trail to improve visitor safety and stabilize eroding trail sections. Rainbow Falls Trail is one of the most popular trails in the park leading hikers to Rainbow Falls and Mt. Le Conte. The planned work will improve overall trail safety and protect natural resources by reducing trail braiding and improving drainage to prevent further erosion.
Hikers can still reach Mt. Le Conte, LeConte Lodge, and the Le Conte Shelter by using one of the other four open trails to the summit including Alum Cave, Boulevard, Trillium Gap, and Brushy Mountain trails. The Mt. LeConte Lodge will remain open and can be accessed from any of these routes during the Rainbow Falls Trail closure.

The Mt. Le Conte backcountry shelter will be closed to the public for eight, 7-night periods beginning July 18 through October 24 to accommodate members of the American Conservation Experience trail crew working on the rehabilitation project. For more information on the shelter closure, please contact the Backcountry Office at 865-436-1297.
Trails Forever is a partnership program between Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Friends of the Smokies. The Friends have donated over $1,500,000 to support the program, in part through the generosity of the Knoxville based Aslan Foundation. The Trails Forever program provides the opportunity for a highly skilled trail crew to focus reconstruction efforts on high use and high priority trails in the park including the recently restored Alum Cave Trail, Chimney Tops Trail, and Forney Ridge Trail. The program also provides a mechanism for volunteers to work alongside the trail crew on these complex trail projects to assist in making lasting improvements to preserve the trails for future generations.

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Freitag, 13. April 2018, 17:24

Popular U.S. national parks to hike fees to $35, not $70

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he U.S. Interior Department will hike fees at the most popular national parks to $35 a vehicle, backing off a plan that would have cost visitors $70 a vehicle to visit Yellowstone and other well-known parks, the agency said on Thursday.

The new plan boosts fees at 117 parks by $5, up from the current $30 but half the figure the Interior Department proposed in October for peak-season visitors at 17 heavily visited parks, it said in a statement.
The fee increase would help finance a $11.6 billion backlog of maintenance and improvements. The proposal generated a wave of protests, and the Interior Department had to extend its comment period by 30 days to accommodate the more than 100,000 responses it received.
“This new fee structure addresses many of the concerns and ideas provided by the public regarding how to best address fee revenue for parks,” the department’s statement said.
The new charges go into effect on June 1, and more than two-thirds of national parks will remain free to enter, it said.
Federal law requires that 80 percent of revenue generated at a national park remains where it is collected. The remaining funds can be funneled to other projects within the system.

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Die Kosten für den "America the Beautiful Pass" bleiben bei 80 $.
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Sonntag, 22. April 2018, 15:43

6 Accidents That Actually Happened in National Parks

Enjoy your trip, but follow the rules—they're there to protect both parks and people.

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Every year, accidents happen at national parks, usually because visitors forget that they’re in the wild. You can avoid unfortunate incidents—like the ones below— by always following park regulations, and telling a ranger if you see dangerous activity.


Don’t Go Near the Edge
To scare his teenage daughter on a 1992 trip, a father stood on the guardrail at Grand Canyon National Park, and pretended to lose his balance by windmilling his arms, but actually lost his footing and fell 400 feet to his death.

Don't Pose With Wild Animals
A woman and her six-year-old daughter were snapping a selfie in Yellowstone with backs turned to a wild bison–only six yards away. The massive animal attacked and tossed her into the air; she escaped with only minor injuries.

Don’t Break the Rules
A tourist dove headfirst into the scalding 200°F Celestine Pool—one of Yellowstone National Park’s 10,000-odd geothermal features—to try to rescue his friend’s yelping dog in 1981.

Don't Fly Drones
A tourist seeking to take photos in Yellowstone crashed a camera-equipped drone into its largest hot spring, the Grand Prismatic Spring. The 2014 incident followed a ban on these so-called unmanned aerial vehicles and left park officials puzzled over how to fish the equipment out of the prized geothermal feature.

Don’t Feed Wild Animals
A boy picnicking with his parents near Yosemite National Park’s Wawona Hotel in 1977 died from a stab wound by sharp antlers after he offered a potato chip to a mule deer.

Don’t Hike in Heels
In order to prevent injuries in Grand Canyon National Park, park rangers at the top of the winding Bright Angel Trail have to remind glamorous tourists that the rocky terrain is a pain for anyone wearing high heels.

Link mit Bildern
USA 1980 - Florida 1989 - Südwesten 2004 - West-Kanada 2005 - Südwesten 2008 - Florida 2009 - Südstaaten 2009
Bei wahrscheinlich USA-Stammtisch Treffen dabei gewesen
Schöne Grüße
Otto

Otto

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  • »Otto« ist männlich
  • »Otto« ist der Autor dieses Themas

Beiträge: 9 121

Registrierungsdatum: 11. Januar 2012

Wohnort: Niederrhein

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120

Sonntag, 22. April 2018, 18:36

50th Anniversary - National Trails System

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National Trails System Trails

The National Trails System Act of 1968 established National Scenic Trails and National Recreation Trails and in 1978 President Carter signed into law a bill that created National Historic Trails.

As the Act stands today, as amended, National Scenic Trails are described as extended trails of more than 100 miles in length that provide for outdoor recreation and “for the conservation and enjoyment of the nationally significant scenic, historic, natural, or cultural qualities of the areas through which such trails may pass.” National Scenic Trails may only be land-based, necessarily excluding any water-based travel routes. These trails may only be designated and authorized by an Act of Congress.

National Historic Trails, according to the Act, are also extended trails, although they may be less than 100 miles in length, and follow historic trails or routes of travel as closely as possible. The purpose of these trails is “the identification and protection of the historic route and its historic remnants and artifacts for public use and enjoyment.” National Historic Trails, unlike National Scenic Trails, may include water-based routes such as the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Just like the National Scenic Trails, National Historic Trails may also only be designated and authorized by an Act of Congress.

National Recreation Trails provide opportunities for outdoor recreation primarily in and around urban areas and have no minimal length requirement. These trails may be designated by either the Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture rather than by an Act of Congress. These trails may exist entirely on state, local, and private property as well as on federal lands.

Link (hier auch weitere Übersichten)
USA 1980 - Florida 1989 - Südwesten 2004 - West-Kanada 2005 - Südwesten 2008 - Florida 2009 - Südstaaten 2009
Bei wahrscheinlich USA-Stammtisch Treffen dabei gewesen
Schöne Grüße
Otto